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Posts Tagged ‘Pyrenees Castle’

pyrenees.castle.tour_.apg_.group_.jpgby Barbara Beckley, Alhambra Preservation Group Board of Directors

It was a once-in-a-lifetime moment. Taking a guided tour inside Alhambra’s beautiful Pyrenees Castle.

Sitting atop a forested hill at the end of a long private driveway off Grand View Drive, for most Alhambra residents the mansion has remained a lifelong mystery, with only glimpses of the castle’s rooftop among the trees leaving us to wonder what it looks like inside.

The curiosity was finally satiated on Saturday, September 21, for a select number of Alhambra Preservation Group members who signed up for the exclusive APG-members-only tour of this beautiful residence.

Arranged through the courtesy of Ladd Jackson, the Estates Director of Hilton & Hyland, which is listing the hilltop castle for $4.9 million, APG members were treated to a one-hour walk and talk – led by Ladd – through the 8,686-square-foot, two story home and its 2.5-acre walled grounds.

A landmark since it was built in 1924 by Sylvester Dupuy, a wealthy Basque immigrant who wanted to recreate a chateau-style residence of his homeland, the mansion was home to his family into the 1960s. It was divided into apartments for a few years, then returned to a single-family mansion in the 1980s. Phil Spector bought it in 1998. His ex-wife is currently in residence.

The day was sunny and bright, and Ladd was extremely knowledgeable as he led us through the grand marble foyer, flanked by the wood paneled living room and formal dining room, both with impressive fireplaces, pointing out the crystal chandeliers, hand-painted murals and original hardwood floors. While renovations have changed much of the interior’s originality, the nine bedrooms, two kitchens, kitchenette, billiards room, full bar and 10th baths remain impressive.

The kitchen and breakfast nook opens off the formal dining room. Walking up the main stairway – and down what we thought was the maids’ stairway – Ladd provided insight into the castle’s mysterious past.

No, the back stairway wasn’t for staff. The Dupuys didn’t have staff, Ladd revealed. They kept up the mansion themselves – and only lived on one side of the house. Being from Europe, they liked wine and made their own. But the castle was built during Prohibition. Ladd pulled out what looked like a heavy wall mirror in one of the bedrooms to reveal a hidden staircase. Just one of the several secret doorways and staircases that led to where the family hid their wine barrels.

We learned that the wide, sunny room on one side of the upstairs, was where Mrs. Dupuy did her needlepoint – a grand take on our grandmothers’ sewing rooms. And the spacious downstairs billiard room originally built and enjoyed by Mr. Dupuy and his buddies had been changed to other uses throughout the years – until Mr. Spector returned it to a billiard room.

Sweeping Los Angeles views from the upstairs veranda were complimented by equally picturesque views from the front of the home, which is landscaped with old-growth trees on one side and a beautiful water fountain in the main courtyard.

Photos were not allowed inside, but members captured memorable photos from the grounds. To see the interior rooms visit the Hilton & Hyland website.

The tour was limited to 50 APG members only. The response was enthusiastic with the tour selling out within 24 hours. Proof that historic preservation remains a priority for many Alhambrans and visiting Alhambra’s most famous mansion is just one of the many benefits of APG membership.

Why not join APG during our 2019 fall membership drive and be a part of our next members-only tour?

Photo courtesy of Alhambra Preservation Group.

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Easter.EggsMany of you may be familiar with Easter eggs. No, not the kind filled with candy that children go hunting for this time of year. The Easter eggs we’re referring to are hidden features, messages or images in a video game. With the holiday weekend upon us, we thought it would be fun to highlight some of Alhambra’s architectural Easter eggs – those architecturally significant structures and/or features that may be easy to miss if you’re not looking for them. Here are just a few – waiting to be found by you!

Millard.Sheets.muralMillard Sheets Murals at Mark Keppel High School – In the late 1930s, as Alhambra’s Mark Keppel High School was being built, Millard Sheets – a Chouinard Art Institute graduate and leading figure behind the California Style watercolor movement – created three exterior enamel and stainless steel relief murals. The murals remain today. The three murals depict the history and culture of early California with one showcasing the state of California, the second featuring Los Angeles County and the third showing three groups of people who populated early California. (Mark Keppel High School, 501 East Hellman Avenue, Alhambra)

DSC_0755Neon “Alhambra” Welcome Signs – At the western, eastern and southern entrances to the city of Alhambra, you’ll find “Alhambra” neon signs, which welcome visitors to our city. Currently only the southern sign on Valley Blvd. is working. Neon signs and their rich history date back to the early 1900s. The French chemist, inventor and engineer Georges Claude introduced the first neon lamp to the public in 1910; he introduced neon signs to the US in 1923. In addition to its welcome signs, Alhambra has two historic businesses that use neon signs. The Hat on Valley Blvd. and Bun N Burger on Main St. both feature vintage neon signs. Alhambra’s Arts and Cultural Events Committee is considering the restoration of Alhambra’s neon welcome signs. APG applauds this idea. (Alhambra’s neon signs – Huntington Blvd. at the border of El Sereno, Main Street at the border of San Gabriel, Valley Blvd. at the border of Los Angeles)

Joe.Candalot.1926Joe Candalot & Sons Building – Just east of Alhambra’ neon sign on Valley Blvd. at the terminus of the 710 Freeway, you’ll find a simple non-descript two-story brick building with the words “Joe Candalot & Sons – 1926” imprinted near the roof. In 1899, Sylvestre Dupuy – the original owner of Alhambra’s Pyrenees Castle – married Anna Candalot, a young Frenchwoman and accomplished chef. They raised four children – a daughter and three sons – in Alhambra. After the Dupuy’s moved into the Pyrenees Castle in 1927, the couple began developing lots on present-day Valley Blvd. Mr. Dupuy set up his sons in the tire business, naming it Y Tire Sales, which is still located on Valley Blvd. and is still owned by the Dupuy family. Whether this building in southwestern Alhambra was at one time the offices of Y Tire Sales has yet to be proven. And who was Joseph Candalot? Anna Candalot Dupuy’s father? Her brother? We’re still researching this branch of the Dupuy family. But the fact that the Candalot name features prominently on the building’s edifice links it to Alhambra’s Pyrenees Castle somehow. (Joe Candalot & Sons Building, 3078 Valley Blvd., Alhambra)

Olson.1930sAlhambra’s Millionaire’s Row – In the early 20th century, many cities had neighborhoods that came to be known as “Millionaire’s Row.” These were streets lined with mansions owned by wealthy and influential city leaders. Alhambra was no different. During the 1920s and 30s, Alhambra’s elite lived on North Almansor Street in the Orange Blossom Manor tract, which featured homes with revivalist architectural styles ranging from English Tudor to American Colonial, from Dutch Colonial to Spanish Colonial. The homes were owned by such Alhambra luminaries as Victor Clyde Forsythe, renowned southwest Plein Air painter; Frank Olson, a lumberman who owned Olson Lumber and whose stunning English Tudor Revival home remains today; and Elmer Bailey, an experienced citrus orchardist who established the Golden Pheasant brand. Homes on Alhambra’s Millionaire’s Row have been featured on home tours and in movies. (Alhambra’s Millionaire’s Row, North Almansor Street north of Main Street)

43.Main.St.FacadeFormer Home Furniture Company Building Façade – As you drive east on Main Street just past Garfield Avenue, look to your left and you’ll discover a building that looks decidedly different than its neighbors. Several years ago, the 1970’s façade of this building was removed and an early 20th century storefront was discovered underneath. This building was the original location of Alhambra’s Home Furniture Company, which was Alhambra’s preeminent furniture store in the early 20th century. Boasting more than 32,000 square feet of furniture display space, the Home Furniture Company saw several owners during its lifetime. Today the façade that remains features decorative pillars and ornamental urns adorned with garlands of fruit and ribbon. (Former Home Furniture Company Building, 43 East Main Street, Alhambra)

We hope you enjoyed reading about a few of Alhambra’s architectural Easter eggs and the stories behind these gems. There are many more to be found in Alhambra, which is why a citywide historic resources inventory is overdue and necessary. We simply don’t know where all of our city’s architectural Easter eggs are hidden. It’s time to find them all and discover Alhambra!

Note: If you do decide to visit these locations or look for additional architectural Easter eggs in Alhambra, we ask that you not disturb business owners, residents and students. Happy hunting!

Did we miss any of Alhambra’s architectural Easter eggs? If you’re aware of any, please tell us about it in the comments below. We’d love to hear from you!

Photo courtesy of Alhambra Preservation Group.

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