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Archive for April, 2018

Lindaraxa.park.signWhen Lindaraxa Park was first developed in the early 20th Century, Alhambra was a vastly different city. Like many surrounding communities, Alhambra was comprised of orange orchards with large Victorian farmhouses dotting the landscape. Lindaraxa Park was no different. Originally a portion of the Alhambra Tract, which was purchased by Alhambra’s founder, Benjamin “Don Benito” Wilson in 1854, the area was filled with citrus orchards belonging to Sunkist founder, Francis Q. Story.

Lindaraxa.Park.Ad.Feb.1914This area located in northeast Alhambra was sub-divided and developed in the early 20th century by the Alhambra Construction Company. Elaborate full-page advertisements in a special holiday advertising section of the Alhambra Advocate generated interest. In keeping with the city’s use of Moorish names, the new development was named Court Lindaraxa. This name was taken from Washington Irving’s book Tales of the Alhambra, from which Alhambra was named. Lindaraxa was a Moorish princess who had an apartment and garden in the Alhambra, a Medieval palace located in Granada, Spain.

Lindaraxa Park made headlines earlier this year when a set of its entrance pillars located at the corner of Granada Avenue and Lindaraxa Park North Drive were restored. One of the pillars had been destroyed by a drunk driver in 2016 and the residents of Lindaraxa Park and Alhambra Preservation Group lobbied the City of Alhambra to rebuild and restore the century-old pillars. Lindaraxa Park residents and the City of Alhambra celebrated the newly rehabilitated pillars in March with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Like the Moorish beauty it was named for, today Lindaraxa Park boasts some of Alhambra’s most diverse and beautiful architecture – Spanish Colonial Revival homes, Mission Revival homes, American Colonial Revival homes, Storybook Cottages – all surrounding a quaint neighborhood park. Lindaraxa Park’s unique character makes it one of Alhambra’s most distinctive and attractive neighborhoods – one worth preserving and protecting.

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Langham.Hotel.Tour

By Barbara Beckley, Vice President

Alhambra Preservation Group (APG) hosted a free guided tour of the historic Langham Huntington hotel in Pasadena – and everyone came! More than 60 APG members and non-members came from throughout Southern California to enjoy our winter outing on Saturday, March 3 at the Langham Huntington Hotel.

Combining fun with our mission to highlight the historic architecture of Alhambra and its surroundings, we were thrilled at the overwhelming interest of history and architecture enthusiasts who came from Alhambra, San Marino, Fullerton, La Canada-Flintridge (five lovely Delta flight attendants), Glendale, West Los Angeles and as far as away as Rancho Cucamonga to experience the glory of our area’s most venerable hotel, opened in 1907.

We were also pleased that it provided a wonderful opportunity to familiarize these like-minded folks with the work of Alhambra Preservation Group. We signed up many people to receive our newsletter and future event information.

The Langham was a most gracious host. Suzie Tadevossian, Langham guest services manager, welcomed our group, followed by remarks from APG board member Susan Bejeckian and APG vice president Barbara Beckley.

Langham.Tour.2Then it was off on the tour. We were divided into three groups of 20 each, to provide a more intimate tour experience. Each of the three lovely Langham Service Stylists: Cherylin Baines, Andres Jackson and Aileen Ventura, provided history, insight and even a bit of gossip as they led us through the public rooms, gardens, across the Picture Bridge (which is undergoing renovation, but replicas of the original paintings will be back and the originals safely protected) and past the private villas. This was the first time many of the participants had experienced the hotel, even though they knew of its landmark status.

Afterward, most everyone stayed for tea or early cocktails, enjoying the elegant ambiance and making new friends. Many of the out-of-towners planned on driving through the area, and I gave directions to Alhambra’s nearby iconic buildings including the Carmelite Monastery, the Norman Rockwell studio home and the Father of the Bride home. A good time was had by all – providing proof of how important it is to preserve and protect our historic assets.

In case you missed this event, The Langham Huntington offers free, two-hour Service Stylist-guided tours daily at 2 p.m.

Photos courtesy of the Langham Huntington Hotel.

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