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Posts Tagged ‘neon signs’

Alhambra.neon.signAnyone who has lived in Alhambra any length of time has probably caught a glimpse of one of three “Alhambra” signs located at the city’s borders – East Main Street on the border of San Gabriel, West Huntington Blvd on the border of El Sereno and West Valley Blvd at the 710 terminus. The problem is that two of the iconic neon signs haven’t worked for decades and the third sign on West Valley, while still working, has been looking worn out and neglected.

That all changed when Alhambra’s Arts Commission voted earlier this year to allocate funds to fix these three neon signs. Alhambra Preservation Group applauds the City’s decision to give these signs a bit of TLC and get them working once more. “Fixing Alhambra’s neon signs is an easy way to preserve an important historic resource and demonstrate pride in our city,” stated Oscar Amaro, APG Founder and President. “I’m sure there are a lot of people who never noticed these signs at night. Now it’s impossible to miss them as you drive into Alhambra after sundown.”

Neon signs were first introduced in the United States in the early 1920s by Georges Claude and his French company Claude Neon. Georges Claude had demonstrated neon lighting in a modern form at the Paris Motor Show in December 1910, but it didn’t catch on here in the U.S. until 1923 when a Los Angeles Packard car dealership purchased two signs advertising “Packard” for $24,000. Soon after that, neon lighting became a popular outdoor advertising fixture in America with patrons stopping to stare at the neon signs dubbed “liquid fire.”

In Alhambra, there are several establishments who have retained their neon signs from the mid-20th century. The Hat on the corner of Valley Blvd and Garfield Avenue lights up their neon sign nightly. Alhambra’s Bun and Burger located on east Main Street has an intricate working neon sign, but it’s rarely on because the restaurant is not open during evening hours. One of Alhambra’s most iconic neon signs was recently removed when Twohey’s left its location at the corner of Atlantic and Huntington.

Alhambra.Come.Again.Soon.NeonWe are pleased that Alhambra’s welcome signs have returned in a blaze of glory. Here’s hoping that they shine bright for generations to come.

Do you have a favorite neon sign in Alhambra or Southern California? Let us know in the comments below.

Photo courtesy of Alhambra Preservation Group.

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